1. mistergoodlife:

"Familiar House", Marbella, Spain ║ Via ║ Goodlife

    mistergoodlife:

    "Familiar House", Marbella, Spain ║ ViaGoodlife

    (via italian-luxury)

    6 days ago  /  7,781 notes  /  Source: mistergoodlife

  2. photo

    photo

    6 days ago  /  728 notes  /  Source: atlasobscura

  3. (via ruinedchildhood)

    1 week ago  /  348,837 notes  /  Source: daddyfuckedme

  4. (via italian-luxury)

    1 week ago  /  1,404 notes  /  Source: mamma-mia-food

  5. automotivated:

DSC_0141 by N-D Photography on Flickr.

    automotivated:

    DSC_0141 by N-D Photography on Flickr.

    2 weeks ago  /  226 notes  /  Source: automotivated

  6. (via italian-luxury)

    2 weeks ago  /  11,685 notes  /  Source: funktionality

  7. (via italian-luxury)

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  8. automotivated:

crash—test:

LIN_7413 (by HRE Wheels)

    automotivated:

    crash—test:

    LIN_7413 (by HRE Wheels)

    2 weeks ago  /  264 notes  /  Source: Flickr / hrewheels

  9. (via thetieguy)

    2 weeks ago  /  701 notes  /  Source: pinterest.com

  10. (via italian-luxury)

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  11. the-actual-universe:

Cassini Continues to Amaze After a Decade of Exploring Saturn July 1st marked ten years since the Cassini spacecraft inserted itself into orbit around Saturn and it has been beaming back images and data of the ringed planet and its moons ever since. Cassini’s carefully planned orbit puts it on the opposite side of Saturn’s rings as us here on Earth — this is called “occultation”. The image we see here is the first radio occultation observation of the ring system, taken on May 3, 2005 by Cassini. Three different radio signals (0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm wavelength of Ka-, X-, and S-bands respectively) were simultaneously sent through the rings to us here on Earth. Scientists were able to observe any change of each signal as Cassini moved behind the rings, highlighting the distribution of ring material as a function of distance from Saturn, or an optical depth profile.The image seen here was created from these optical depth profiles and shows the ring structure at 6 miles (10 kilometers) in resolution. The colors tell us about the rings and the particles that comprise them, including particle size variations in different areas thanks to the three radio signals measured effects. In the image, the purple regions have low concentrations of particles under 2 inches/5 centimeters in size. The green and blue areas contain particles smaller than 2 inches (5 centimeters) and smaller than 1/3 of an inch (1 centimeter). The wide white band near the center of the B ring is incredibly dense and even blocked two of the three radio signals, thus hindering us from receiving accurate data about this band. Other radio observations show all areas contain a wide range of particle sizes, even particles as large as boulders! (several meters across)-ALTCredit: NASA/JPL

    the-actual-universe:

    Cassini Continues to Amaze After a Decade of Exploring Saturn 

    July 1st marked ten years since the Cassini spacecraft inserted itself into orbit around Saturn and it has been beaming back images and data of the ringed planet and its moons ever since. Cassini’s carefully planned orbit puts it on the opposite side of Saturn’s rings as us here on Earth — this is called “occultation”. The image we see here is the first radio occultation observation of the ring system, taken on May 3, 2005 by Cassini. 

    Three different radio signals (0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm wavelength of Ka-, X-, and S-bands respectively) were simultaneously sent through the rings to us here on Earth. Scientists were able to observe any change of each signal as Cassini moved behind the rings, highlighting the distribution of ring material as a function of distance from Saturn, or an optical depth profile.

    The image seen here was created from these optical depth profiles and shows the ring structure at 6 miles (10 kilometers) in resolution. The colors tell us about the rings and the particles that comprise them, including particle size variations in different areas thanks to the three radio signals measured effects. 

    In the image, the purple regions have low concentrations of particles under 2 inches/5 centimeters in size. The green and blue areas contain particles smaller than 2 inches (5 centimeters) and smaller than 1/3 of an inch (1 centimeter). The wide white band near the center of the B ring is incredibly dense and even blocked two of the three radio signals, thus hindering us from receiving accurate data about this band. Other radio observations show all areas contain a wide range of particle sizes, even particles as large as boulders! (several meters across)

    -ALT

    Credit: NASA/JPL

    2 weeks ago  /  140 notes  /  Source: the-actual-universe

  12. (via italian-luxury)

    2 weeks ago  /  17,228 notes  /  Source: rustinginthelonelyharbour

  13. automotivated:

Black Fury (by Bonnny)

    automotivated:

    Black Fury (by Bonnny)

    (via automotivated)

    2 weeks ago  /  2,195 notes  /  Source: Flickr / bonny13

  14. justphamous:

Greek Modern Luxury Home | JustPhamous

    justphamous:

    Greek Modern Luxury Home | JustPhamous

    (via italian-luxury)

    2 weeks ago  /  2,001 notes  /  Source: justphamous

  15. (via italian-luxury)

    2 weeks ago  /  1,665 notes  /  Source: gastrogirl